Balancing Work/Write duties.

Hi All!

Long time no see. I’ve missed this blog and I’ve missed you all, I’ve just been going through an actual metric ton of work related things which has really eaten into my writing time. My whole schedule got put out of whack and with five projects on the go I found myself burning out.

So, now that I’ve got some quiet time, I figured I’d sit down and reassess my plans. I’m still working hard on Pirates of Time, and the Dreamstealer  and Excalibur Chronicles. I’ve also added Tales From Below to my growing WIP list. Seems like the work is never ending, but I’ve got some software now (hello Aeon Timeline 2!) and I’ve got some maps I’m working on for Dreamstealer. Which are going to look incredible on my wall and in the books when they’re done.

The main problem I’m finding is that with each new project comes a whole slew of issues that I might not have thought about. TFB is proving to be a whole different kettle of fish, with exploration of Lovecraftian themes and a twist on a traditional fairytale about good and evil. My characters all despise each other and its all I can do to try and get one of them to do something useful! Ugh. This is my attempt at trying to do something different and instead all my brain can think about is new sci-fi plotlines that I can only write down and not fully explore.

Doesn’t actually help that it is literally sweltering here in the land of Oz, or as my friends lovingly call it, Ovenville.

At the very least I’ve managed to extricate some old books from my shelves, they’re off across the seas and into lifeline to go to new homes. I will miss them dearly.

I should get back to writing this weekly. Its happening.



Writing Adventures and Other Stuff

Hello all!

Yes, yes, I know. It’s been forever and I should really update this more frequently.

Life has been… busy. Extremely busy. Work keeps sapping my energy and its all I can do to keep the drafts flowing. I’ve got an anthology piece to finish by November, and the draft of Pirates of Time to finish this year so she’s ready for edits. And only a few months to go! Seems like time escapes me when I want it the most.

With the new season comes a new burst for creativity, so I’m hoping this month I can get through at least one project. Still lots on my plate but scheduling is key and its becoming more obvious I need to set aside an hour or so for actual writing.

My book collection seems to be multiplying at a rate faster than I can keep up with, so some of my beloved reading material will have to move on to a better home. A fact I am already grieving over.

That’s it for now, not much else to say. Keep writing!


Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time

If you’d ever wondered what the universe was made of and how it came to be, and don’t mind your technical science, then this book is going to be just the ticket. Hawking gives us a very in depth and inquisitive look at the origins of our understanding of the universe, and makes it both readable and fascinating to readers of any age or education level.

As most of you probably know, I write sci-fi when I’m not running about battling pirates or making sure my dragons don’t argue over whether or not the prophecies are working right.  I’m also a closet astronomer and I love dabbling in astrophysics sometimes. I picked up A Brief History on the recommendation of another friend when I was discussing the genesis of black holes and the potential for wormholes to form in our galaxy, and I was not disappointed in what I found. Sure, it took me a few months to read in between working way too much and the loss of my bedside lamp, but I got there and boy was it a good ride. It expanded on a few things I already vaguely knew about (stuff like string theory, quantum entanglement, and the grand unified theory), but also educated me on the intricacies of said theories and added colour to what was once a textbook interpretation. Hawking is a capable and expansive writer, if not entirely personable (his style is heavily influenced by academic style but no less enjoyable), and I’d certainly read more of his work in the future. I’ve got the follow-up book, A Briefer History of Time, sitting in wait on my bedside table, but for now I think I’ll go explore some other things.

Of late I’ve been going on a bit of a reading binge to help combat some of my seemingly ever-present stress, and my horrible writer’s block. So far it seems to have helped, but sadly my bookcase is a bit too full and some of my books will have to go.

Anyway that’s it from me for now. Stay tuned for next time!


Glenn Cooper’s Library Of The Dead, and an update

Hello everyone and welcome back to uh, that thing I do where I blog about books!

I know, I know. It’s been ages. I’ve been dealing with a lot of… stuff, lately. Personal, most of it good but some things have required me to adjust and its taken up a lot of my time. Along with that I’ve been madly collecting books (help, I might get swallowed by them) and working furiously on my novel, Pirates of Time, which I’m planning to publish this year if the proverbial fates allow. Work has been swallowing up a lot of time too so that’s been fun (regular travel to the other side of town, aka, where did five hours of my life just go).

Onwards with the review! I’ve been reading Library of the Dead for quite some time now. Largely, this has been because of a very slow start to the book itself. I was convinced I wouldn’t keep it and just send it off to another good home, buuuut the end has me clinging onto it like a favourite sweater. The writing style is clipped and to the point, which is something I’ve always liked in an adventure novel. It’s got a little mystery thrown in, along with some perhaps predictable but still fun romance, and it kept me hooked until the end. It reminded me very much of Dan Brown’s The DaVinci Code, specifically in its structure and pace. It certainly fits in with the adventure theme that the late 2000’s produced, and has the same style of witty banter and relateable characters.

The main character, Will, is a perpetually drunken FBI agent tasked with unravelling the Doomsday Case, a string of what is assumed to be murders with no obvious culprit. His search leads him down many twisting paths, but the last thing he expected was to uncover a centuries old mystery that itself has no logical explanation. His investigation is often stymied by false leads and an uncooperative government, and ends with a twist that leaves him both jobless and shocked, but a better man. There’s a lead to a sequel as well, The Book of Souls, which Will again features in. The first chapter and the prologue were included at the end of my copy, and it looks to be a book I’d happily read though it seems to be based on a similar premise to its predecessor.

Critiques and other comments… the only thing that really bothered me was the slow start to the novel. In saying that, the slow approach did help to make the climaxes that much more exciting. The novel’s characters did play to some stereotypes, but in the end it worked in favour of the piece by adding extra colour and intrigue to the plot. Will was an unpredictable narrator: you never quite knew what he’d do next, and his believability was only enhanced.

All in all, I’ve decided to hold onto Library of the Dead, and I look forward to reading its sequel. It’s a slamming adventure novel and one I’d definitely recommend to anyone who is a die hard fan of the genre.

Happy reading, folks, and stay tuned for more updates and reviews!


The Curse of Writer’s Block

Hello everyone and welcome to a much delayed post! I do apologise for my absence. I’ve been dealing with some personal issues and I hope they’re all resolved. AT ANY RATE, said issues have been giving me a horrible case of writer’s block and it is with this post that I tell you what I did to fix it! Also share some fun things.


So. Reasons why this is great. One, it’s designed for D&D games. Two, it also works for PoT, which is what I’ve been trying to get my head around with the writer’s block.


This site has been my go-to for quite some time now. It’s particularly good for doing scenes situated in craggy mountain passes, or like… monasteries and things.


I had a friend point out to me how important it is to keep yourself in good check, even when you think you might be okay. I’ve been working a heck of a lot lately and my boss was most wonderful and thought I could do with five days off. I’ve been spending the time gaming and not doing very much, but I’d also forgotten that sometimes you just have to go outside for some fresh air, eat healthy, go do something wholesome. AND DRINK YOUR WATER. Tea is good and all but you can’t survive on it. Stress relief is also very important, particularly if your ordinary home environment isn’t as supportive as it could be. I like to try and meditate or go visit different parts of the city sometimes for this, and it really does help.

ORDER THE FOURTH: Expand Your Horizons!

So here you are, a writer, sitting with your laptop or your Alphasmart or your notepad, and you think to yourself that your writing might be getting a bit stale. ADVENTURE, MY FRIENDS! Go out, explore the world. It’s there for you to enjoy, so go do it. Lean something new. Pick up a book, visit a museum or go see a play. Sometimes your work can seem stale because you’ve been staring at it for too long, or because your surroundings are also stale and a bit crabby because when was the last time you vacuumed? Made that bed? Sorted that kitchen cupboard that’s been bugging you for weeks? Do the thing. Make the progress. Clear the cobwebs. WRITE.

So yeah. That’s my little spiel for the time being. I’ve also been tearing my way through a few books, which I might review as time goes on.

Do stay tuned, and good luck with your projects both great and small! Or like, anything in between. Do your thing.



Hello everyone and welcome to November, 2016! Or as I like to call it, complete chaos.

I know the title’s a bit cryptic, but after having to speedread my way through a 329 page autobiography (it took me 2 hours) I wondered for a moment about the distinction between speedreading and, well, taking one’s time. Personally, I’ve always been a fan of taking my time with a book. Sitting down with a cup of good tea or coffee and immersing myself in the words. As a writer, I’ve always intended for my own books to be taken slowly, but looking at examples like The Silmarillion or other particularly long books makes me wonder if a shorter novel is the way to go. The proof is in the pudding, as they say, or the proverbial finished product. Guess we’ll see how it pans out.

How do you all like your books? Short and sweet, or long and languorous?

Now back to knocking over today’s word count.